Incentive Housing Zone & Similar Zoning Regulations

 

Towns throughout Connecticut are exploring land use and zoning options to help expand access to affordable housing and multifamily housing. Below is information regarding zoning regulations conducive to affordable and multifamily housing gathered from towns that have passed or proposed regulations to address this issue. Where possible, we have excerpted the relevant sections. 

Incentive Housing Zone and similar regulations by town:

  • Avon
    Avon adopted an Affordable Housing Overlay Zone (AHOZ) in 2016. At least 20% of a development’s units are restricted to residents who earn 80% or less of the town's median income. These developments are required to have 30 year deeds (see pg. 24). The maximum density requirements are 6 units per acre for single family developments, 10 units per acre for duplex / townhome developments, and 20 units per acre for multi-family developments (see pgs. 23-24).
    Click here for regulations.
     
  • Barkhamsted
    Barkhamsted proposed an Incentive Housing (IH) District in 2015. The minimum density requirements are 4 units per acre for single family developments, 6 units per acre for duplex / townhome developments, and 10 units per acre for multi-family developments (see 193-67.2.c). Mixed-use developments require special exception (see 193-67.2.f). 
    Click here for regulations.

     
  • Berlin
    Berlin proposed the Kensington Overlay (KO) Zone in 2015. The maximum density varies from 8 units per acre to 20 units per acre, depending on the sub-district. No residential units in this zone can have more than two bedrooms (see pg. 4-5). 
    Click here for regulations.
     
  • Bethel
    Bethel adopted a Designed Conservation District (DCD) in 2006. Twenty percent of a development’s units are restricted to residents who earn 80% or less of the median income. Multi-family developments cannot exceed 4 units per structure (see pg. 103). 
    Click here for regulations.
     
  • Branford
    Branford adopted an Incentive Housing Overlay District (IHOD) in 2007. The regulations allow a maximum density of 20 units per acre (see 5.7.C) but developments are only allowed by special exception (see 5.7.D). 
    Click here for regulations.

     
  • Brookfield
    Brookfield adopted an Incentive Housing District in 2010 that spans over 175 acres of land. Twenty – thirty percent of a project’s units are restricted to residents who earn 80% or less of the median income. The density requirements are 6-12 units per acre for single family developments, 10-20 units per acre for duplex / townhome developments, and 20-24 units per acre for multi-family developments (see 4-51).
    Click here for regulations.

     
  • Canaan (Falls Village)
    Canaan adopted an Incentive Housing Zone (IHZ) in 2013 that spans over 65 acres of land. The designated site can accommodate 27 bedrooms due to on-site septic constraints. Some of the units would be targeted to residents who earn 50% or less of the median income. 
    Click here for regulations.

     
  • Canton
    Canton proposed a New Housing Development (Inclusionary) where 20-30% of a project’s units are restricted to residents who earn 80% or less of the median income. The minimum density requirements are 6 units per acre for single family developments, 10 units per acre for duplex / townhome developments, and 20 units per acre for multi-family developments (see pg. 78). Below market rate dwelling units shall be maintained for 30 years or the life of the unit, whichever is longer (see pg. 79). 
    Click here for regulations.
     
  • Clinton
    Clinton adopted a Planned Residential Development (PRD). Lots should be between 3-10 acres large with no more than 40 units on one site (see pg. 10036). Efficiencies as well as one, two, and three-bedroom units are permitted (see pg. 10037). 
    Click here for regulations.

     
  • Colchester
    Colchester adopted an Affordable Housing Development. Ten percent of any housing development with more than 6 single‐family units or more than 3 multi‐family units must be affordable to residents whose income is less than or equal to 80% of the area or statewide median income, whichever is less. It also must be deed restricted and homebuyers cannot incur monthly housing costs that exceed 30% of their monthly income (see pg. 39, 42). 
    Click here for regulations.

     
  • Darien
    Darien adopted Inclusionary Zoning Regulations in 2008. Multi-family units and single-family subdivisions are required to designate a minimum of 12% of the units to residents who earn 80% or less of the state median income (see 583). These developments are required to have deeds that last 40 years or the life of the unit, whichever is longer (see 586). The affordable housing requirement can also be met by building affordable units off-site or paying a “fee-in-lieu” cash contribution (see 583).
    Click here for regulations.
     
  • East Lyme
    East Lyme adopted an Incentive Housing Zone (IHZ) in 2010 that spans almost 10 acres of land. The minimum density requirements are 6 units per acre for single family developments, 10 units per acre for duplex / townhome developments, and 20 units per acre for multi-family developments (see 33.9.2). Non-residential uses are permitted as-of-right (see 33.7). 
    Click here for regulations.

     
  • Fairfield
    Fairfield adopted a Transit-Oriented Development Park. Properties within the Transit-Oriented Development Park can have up to 50 bedrooms per acre (see 13.14.4). Any development in Fairfield with 10 or more residential units must restrict at least 10% of these units to households that earn 80% or less of the area median income (see 25.7.9). 
    Click here for regulations.

     
  • Greenwich
    Greenwich adopted regulations for moderate-income dwelling units in business zones. A minimum of 20% of the units in these developments must be deed restricted for 40 years (see 9-38). A development proposal including moderate-income dwelling units requires a Special Permit (see 9-36). 
    Click here for regulations.

     
  • Guilford
    Guilford adopted Planned Residential Developments in 2012. Structures are only permitted by special permit (see pg. 65). Development proposals that include affordable housing units are given ability to increase density within the project by lowering the minimum lot sizes (see pgs. 67-68). 
    Click here for regulations.

     
  • Haddam
    Haddam adopted a Housing Opportunity District where 25% of a project’s units are restricted to residents who earn 80% or less of the area or state median income, whichever is less. These developments are required to have 40 year deeds (see 7.4). The maximum density requirements are 8 units per acre for single family developments and 12 units per acre for multi-family developments (see 13B-14). 
    Click here for regulations.

     
  • Hamden
    Hamden adopted regulations for Affordable Housing in Multi-Family Dwellings. Developments with 5 or more units are required to restrict 20% of their units for residents who earn 80% or less of the median income for the New Haven area. These developments are required to have 40 year deeds (see 652.3.1). 
    Click here for regulations.

     
  • Milford
    Milford adopted an Open Space Affordable Housing Development - Multi-Family District where 25% of a project’s units are restricted to residents who earn 80% or less of the area or state median income, whichever is less. These developments are required to have 30 year deeds (see 3.24.4.7). Lots in these developments must be at least 20 acres. Efficiency bedrooms, one-bedrooms, and two-bedrooms must be 2,000, 2,500, and 5,000 square feet, respectively. 
    Click here for regulations.
     
  • New London
    New London adopted an Incentive Housing Zone (IHZ) in 2010 in three different areas of the town that total over 70 acres. The maximum density requirements are 20 units per acre in two of the subdistricts and 27.5 units per acre in the third subdistrict. Increased density is permitted under certain circumstances (see 537.5). Twenty percent of a project’s units are restricted to eligible households. These developments are required to have 30 year deeds (see 537.7). 
    Click here for regulations

     
  • Newtown
    Newtown adopted an Incentive Housing Overlay Zone (IHOZ) where 20% of a development’s units are affordable. These developments are required to have 30 year deeds (see 3.03.300). Lots in these developments must be at least 10 acres (3.03.200). The maximum density requirements are 12 units per acre for townhouses and mixed use developments (see 3.03.310). Units within these developments must be between 1-3 bedrooms (see 3.03.600). 
    Click here for regulations

     
  • Norwalk
    Norwalk adopted Workforce Housing where 10% of a project’s units are restricted to residents who earn 80% or less of the area median income. These developments are required to have deeds that last the life of the unit. Priority is given to tenants displaced by the new development as well as employees and residents of Norwalk (see 118.1050). 
    Click here for regulations.

     
  • Old Saybrook
    Old Saybrook adopted an Incentive Housing Zone (IHZ) in 2010 that spans over 5 acres of land. The minimum density requirements are 6 units per acre for single family developments, 10 units per acre for duplex / townhome developments, and 20 units per acre for multi-family developments (see 54.6). Non-residential uses require special exception (see 54.3). 
    Click here for regulations.

     
  • Plainville
    Plainville adopted a Redevelopment Design District (RDD) in 2015 where 20% of a project’s units are restricted to residents who earn 80% or less of the area median income (see pg. 51). These developments are required to have 30 year deeds (see pg. 52). No residential units in this zone can have more than two bedrooms (see pg. 59). 
    Click here for regulations.

     
  • Redding
    Redding adopted an Incentive Housing Zone (IHZ) in 2013 that spans almost 20 acres of land. The development must be within walking distance (1,500 feet or less) of a transit station. The density requirements are 6-15 units per acre depending on the structure and location. 
    Click here for regulations.

     
  • Sharon
    Sharon adopted an Incentive Housing Zone (IHZ) in 2010 for two different areas of town that total almost 8 acres of land. The maximum density requirements are 6 units per acre for single family developments and 10 units per acre for duplex / townhome developments (see pg. 70). Both uses are permitted as-of-right (see pg. 66). 
    Click here for regulations.

     
  • Simsbury
    Simsbury adopted a Workforce Housing Overlay Zone (WHOZ) in 2013. The zone requires that 20% of a development’s units are affordable. These developments are required to have 30 year deeds (see pg. 4). The minimum density requirements are 6 units per acre for single family developments, 10 units per acre for duplex / townhome developments, and 20 units per acre for multi-family as well as mixed use developments (see pg. 2). 
    Click here for regulations.

     
  • Southington
    Southington adopted a Housing Opportunity District (HOD) in 2007. Fifteen percent of a project’s units are restricted to residents who earn 80% or less of the area or state median income, whichever is less. An additional 15% are restricted to residents who earn 60% or less of the area or state median income. These developments are required to have 40 year deeds (see 3-08.7). The maximum density requirements are 8 units per acre (see 3-08.6). 
    Click here for regulations.

     
  • Stamford
    Stamford adopted an Inclusionary Housing Program where a minimum of 6% to 12% of a development’s units are required to be Below Market Rate (BMR), depending on the zoning district. Monthly housing costs for the BMR Dwelling Units cannot exceed 30% of a household’s monthly income. A BMR requirement can be satisfied through a “fee-in-lieu” cash contribution (see 7.5-2). 
    Click here for regulations.

     
  • Stratford
    Stratford adopted an Affordable Housing Development where 20% of a project’s units are restricted to residents who earn 80% or less of the area median income. These developments are required to have 20 year deeds (see pg. 58). 
    Click here for regulations.

     
  • Tolland
    Tolland adopted workforce housing in the Tolland Village Area (TVA) where 20% of a project’s units are restricted. However, this percentage can be reduced to as low as 12% if the development provides unrequired amenities that are beneficial to the entire community. These housing developments are required to have 40 year deeds (see 7-7). 
    Click here for regulations.

     
  • Torrington
    Torrington adopted an Incentive Housing Zone (IHZ) in 2011 that spans over 15 acres of land. Private applicants must designate 20% of a project’s units to residents who earn 80% or less of the median income, while public applicants must designate 100% of a project’s units to residents who earn 80% or less of the median income. Both are required to have 30 year deeds (see 4.15.6). The maximum density requirements are 15 units per acre for townhouses, 30 units per acre for multi-family developments, and 40 units per acre for mixed use developments (see 4.15.3). 
    Click here for regulations.

     
  • Wallingford
    Wallingford adopted an Incentive Housing Zone (IHZ) in 2014 in three different areas of the town that total over 20 acres of land. The density requirements are 10-15 units per acre for townhouse developments and 20-26 units per acre for multi-family as well as mixed use developments (see 104-105). 
    Click here for regulations.

     
  • Watertown
    Watertown received preliminary determination of eligibility for its Incentive Housing Zone (IHZ) in 2011. The zone spans almost 5 acres of land. The maximum density for affordable housing developments may be increased by up to 40% from what’s permitted by the underlying district. Affordable housing developments may be permitted by special permit (see pg. 147). 
    Click here for regulations.

     
  • Westbrook
    Westbrook adopted an Incentive Housing Zone (IHZ) in 2013 that spans over 3 acres. Developments must be built 1 mile from public transportation or near concentrated developments (e.g., Town Center). The minimum density requirements are 6 units per acre for single family developments, 10 units per acre for duplex / townhome developments, and 20 units per acre for multi-family developments (see 4-38). 
    Click here for regulations.

     
  • Westport
    Westport adopted an Inclusionary Housing Overlay District where 20% of a project’s units are restricted to residents who earn 80% or less of the area or state median income, whichever is less (see pg. 5). Developments cannot have more than 20 bedrooms per acre. An additional 6 bedrooms per acre is permitted for affordable units that are exempt from this calculation (see pg. 1). 
    Click here for regulations.

     
  • Windham
    Windham adopted an Incentive Housing Zone (IHZ) in 2013 that spans over 10 acres. Twenty percent of a project’s units are restricted to residents who earn 80% or less of the median income for the town in Windham (see 30.3 and 30.11.4). 
    Click here for regulations.

 

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Updated July 1, 2016

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